Al-Shabaab Attacks Kenya Police Station

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Somali militant group Al-Shabaab has attacked a police station in Kenya near the border with Somalia.

Kenyan authorities say fighters crossed the border early Thursday morning to attack the police station in the northeastern village of Hameey, in Garissa County. Two police officers are missing following the attack, while one is also injured and one of the attackers was reportedly killed.

 

Police fight off terrorists

Police spokesman George Kinoti gave details of the attack in a statement on Thursday. He said Al-Shabaab fighters targeted the police station in two Land Cruisers “but the officers in the camp managed to repulse them amid [a] fierce exchange of fire.”

Local residents also confirmed the battle, saying the fight lasted more than 30 minutes, with machine guns and rocket-propelled grenades being fired. They also accounted for the terrorist killed during the gunfight and at least one injured officers.

 

Al-Shabaab claims attack

The militant group has since claimed responsibility for the attack in a statement aired on Radio Andalus – Al-Shabaab’s main media channel. Crucially, the statement didn’t mention anything about the two missing police officers, which will offer some hope they haven’t been kidnapped by the group.

Al-Shabaab vows it will continue to stage attacks on Kenyan soil, in retaliation for the country’s military involvement in Somalia. Garissa County is a prime target for the group, sitting just across the border with Somalia, where Al-Shabaab fighters regularly stage attacks of various magnitudes.

 

Featured image: YouTube

 

About Aaron Brooks

Aaron Brooks is a UK journalist who wants to cut out the international agendas in news. Spending his early years in both England and Northern Ireland he saw the difference between reality and media coverage at an early age. After graduating from the University of Chester with a BA in journalism, his travels revealed just how large the gap between news and the real world can be. As Editor-in-Chief at East Africa Monitor, it’s his job to provide a balanced view of what’s going on in the region for English-speaking audiences.