Senator Demands Action Against UEA “Terrorist Employers” Following Kenyan Deaths

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A senator has called on the Kenyan government to sack all of its envoys in the Middle East as Kenyan workers in the region continue to die in strange circumstances.Senator Emma Mbura has accused the envoys of doing nothing to protect the lives of Kenyan women working in the UAE and brandished the employers of victims as terrorists.

 

Senator speaks out

Hon. Emma Mbura spoke out at the Mombasa Pandya Memorial Hospital mortuary on Saturday, as the family of a 24-year-old woman who died in Abu Dabi picked up her remains for burial.

Salama Nyamvula had been working in Abu Dhabi for less than two months before she died and the cause of her death remains unknown. The family never received a medical report to explain the circumstances of her death and a pathologist in Kenya has said a post-mortem is now impossible, following treatment the body received in Abu Dhabi.

 

Focus on Kenyan envoys

Senator Mbura condemns agents who take Kenyan women to the Middle East – firt of all for failing to protect them, but also allowing questions to go unanswered.

“We have never been told the truth behind the deaths of our daughters in Saudi Arabia,” she said. “The ambassadors are asleep as we bury our children. Why can’t these envoys stop such cases and ensure those responsible are held accountable by respective authorities?” she added.

The agent who took 24-year-old Nyamvula to Abu Dhabi has gone missing after hearing about her death. Hon. Mbura says the Kenyan government needs to take action against envoys that fail to protect the country’s citizens.

The mistreatment of Kenyan workers in the Middle East has been widely reported in recent years, forcing the government to ban agents found to be involved in recruitment. However, human trafficking proves difficult to control and many young women in Kenya choose the risk of seeking employment in the Middle East over poverty at home.

 

Featured image:

Kenya flag 300“. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.