Somalia: President replaces Supreme Court chief in judiciary overhaul

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Somali president Mohamed Abdullahi Farmajo has replaced the country’s chairman of the Supreme Court, as part of a judiciary overhaul.

The move sees former chairman Ibrahim Idle Suleiman replaced by Bashe Yusuf Ahmed as the head of Somalia’s Supreme Court. Suleiman was fired after a public backlash over numerous judicial decisions and allegations of corruption. His replacement was confirmed on Sunday in a presidential decree broadcast on state radio in Mogadishu.

President appoints new chief justice

Following the dismissal of Ibrahim Idle Suleiman, the little-known Bashe Yusuf Ahmed was promptly appointed as Somalia’s new chief justice. The 36-year-old’s appointment was met with mixed reactions with some suggesting President Farmajo acted unlawfully by sacking Suleiman.

Others question the ability of Ahmed to fulfil his role as head of the Supreme Court, giving his lack of experience.

Ahmed’s connections with Somaliland are also coming under scrutiny, where he is an active politician and member of the opposition Wadani party, which is led by Abdirahman Mohamed Abdullahi.

Social media has been flooded with comments from people criticising President Farmajo for appointing such a young person for the role of chief justice while others have defended Ahmed, saying he shouldn’t be judged by his age and suggesting young professionals in Somali need to be given a chance.

Featured image: By AMISOM Photo/Ilyas Ahmed – https://www.flickr.com/photos/au_unistphotostream/31973423443/in/dateposted/, CC0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=56105669

About Aaron Brooks

Aaron Brooks is a UK journalist who wants to cut out the international agendas in news. Spending his early years in both England and Northern Ireland he saw the difference between reality and media coverage at an early age. After graduating from the University of Chester with a BA in journalism, his travels revealed just how large the gap between news and the real world can be. As Editor-in-Chief at East Africa Monitor, it’s his job to provide a balanced view of what’s going on in the region for English-speaking audiences.