DRC: Ebola centre attacked again; 1 police officer killed

article-img

An Ebola treatment centre in the east of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has been attacked for the second time, killing a police officer and wounding a health worker.

The facility, which is located in North Kivu province, had only resumed operations the previous week after a previous attack forced the centre to close. The DRC is currently grappling with its worst Ebola outbreak in history and efforts to curb the disease are being hampered by ongoing security troubles in various parts of the country.

Ebola centre attacked again

On Saturday, members of the Mai-Mai rebel group attacked an Ebola centre in the city of Butembo, in North Kivu, northeastern DRC. The facility had only recently reopened after a previous attack by armed gunmen forced it to cease operations but, this time, security measures were in place and Saturday’s attack was quickly repelled by security forces.

However, one police officer was killed during the attack and a health worker who was also injured is still in hospital being treated for a gunshot wound.

The attack was carried out on the same day director-general of the World Health Organization (WHO), Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, was due to visit the centre.

“To conquer Ebola in DRC, we must strike a delicate balance between providing accessible care, maintaining the neutrality of the response and protecting patients and staff from attacks by armed groups,” Tedros wrote on Twitter later on Saturday.

Featured image: Google Maps

About Aaron Brooks

Aaron Brooks is a UK journalist who wants to cut out the international agendas in news. Spending his early years in both England and Northern Ireland he saw the difference between reality and media coverage at an early age. After graduating from the University of Chester with a BA in journalism, his travels revealed just how large the gap between news and the real world can be. As Editor-in-Chief at East Africa Monitor, it’s his job to provide a balanced view of what’s going on in the region for English-speaking audiences.