Somalia: US reopens permanent USAID mission

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The United States is reopening its permanent US Agency for International Development (USAID) Mission in Somalia, more than 28 years after it closed in 1991

While the US has maintained diplomatic ties with Somalia, the US Embassy in the Horn of African nation was closed in 1991 following the collapse of the country’s central government. However, the US is resuming an increasingly active role in Somalia as the country attempts to overcome its long-standing security problems.

USAID reopens in Somalia

USAID operates in developing countries all over the world and nations that have experienced insecurity. Above all, it aims to protect US interests in foreign countries by supporting development projects and regional forces – not always on the side of the local government.

USAID has come in for criticism for supporting rebels attempting to topple governments identified as a threat to US interests, most recently in Venezuela.

In the case of Somalia, USAID aims to support the country’s fractured government in its fight against insecurity and help it maintain its fragile democracy. It also announced on Monday that almost $185 million in humanitarian assistance will be dedicated to dealing with food insecurity in Somalia.

Earlier this month, the UN said more than two million people in the country are at risk of starvation as drought conditions grip the Horn of Africa nations once again.

Featured image: By USAID in Africa – Expanding Access to Education, Somalia, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=68779282

About Aaron Brooks

Aaron Brooks is a UK journalist who wants to cut out the international agendas in news. Spending his early years in both England and Northern Ireland he saw the difference between reality and media coverage at an early age. After graduating from the University of Chester with a BA in journalism, his travels revealed just how large the gap between news and the real world can be. As Editor-in-Chief at East Africa Monitor, it’s his job to provide a balanced view of what’s going on in the region for English-speaking audiences.