South Sudan: World Vision Worker Killed with His Family in Western Equitoria

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A World Vision International worker was shot dead in Western Equatoria last night, together with his wife and two children.

Unknown gunmen attacked the house of victim Silivinio Caciano at around 12:00am on Wednesday morning. They first shot him and his wife before killing their two children in the other bedroom of the family home.

 

Motive unclear

First Lieutenant Emmanuel Fidel gave details to the media on Wednesday. He told reporters the gunmen remain unknown and it’s still not clear what the motive behind the attack would have been.

“What happened last night at around 12:00 am is that unknown gunmen attacked the house of late Silivinio Caciano and killed him with his wife Josephina Nako John and their two children in a separate bedroom,” Mr Fidel told the press.

He clarified there were no signs of attempted robbery, that it looks like a targeted attack with the sole intention to kill.

 

Continued violence in Western Equatoria

The attack on Caciano’s home isn’t the first of this kind in Western Equatoria. Similar incidents have occurred over the last week, while the house of a Member of Parliament was also attacked on Tuesday night.

Joseph Tindiri said unidentified people were seen in the late hours outside his house on multiple occasions. Gunmen later fired upon his property and a hand grenade exploded but nobody was injured in the attack.

The government has launched an investigation into the ongoing violence in the region, however no arrests have been made so far.

 

Featured image:
By NordNordWestOwn work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=15685409

About Aaron Brooks

Aaron Brooks is a UK journalist who wants to cut out the international agendas in news. Spending his early years in both England and Northern Ireland he saw the difference between reality and media coverage at an early age. After graduating from the University of Chester with a BA in journalism, his travels revealed just how large the gap between news and the real world can be. As Editor-in-Chief at East Africa Monitor, it’s his job to provide a balanced view of what’s going on in the region for English-speaking audiences.