Sudan bans Al Jazeera as protests continue

article-img

Sudan has banned global news network Al Jazeera as pro-democracy protests continue in the country.

Authorities in Khartoum has shut down Al Jazeera’s bureau in the capital and prevented its journalists from reporting, according to a statement released by the network on Friday. Sudan is currently under military rule after former president Omar al-Bashir was ousted from power last month.

Al Jazeera shut down in Sudan

“The network sees this as an attack on media freedom, professional journalism, and the basic tenets of the right for people to know and understand the reality of what is happening in Sudan,” Al Jazeera said in a statement on Friday.

Sudan’s ruling military council is yet to respond to reports of Al Jazeera being shut down. The reason for the ban remains unclear but the Qatar-funded network has drawn criticism from Egypt, Bahrain, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, which are all involved in a boycott of Doha, following a diplomatic dispute.

Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates are among the few countries that have stated their support for Sudan’s ruling military council.

Tensions are rising in the Sudanese capital as civilian forces continue to pile pressure upon the military to implement a civilian government. A pregnant woman was killed on Thursday after an argument broke out between security officials and soldiers saw them exchange fire, hitting the woman with stray bullets.

Featured image: By M.Saleh – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=77879589

About Aaron Brooks

Aaron Brooks is a UK journalist who wants to cut out the international agendas in news. Spending his early years in both England and Northern Ireland he saw the difference between reality and media coverage at an early age. After graduating from the University of Chester with a BA in journalism, his travels revealed just how large the gap between news and the real world can be. As Editor-in-Chief at East Africa Monitor, it’s his job to provide a balanced view of what’s going on in the region for English-speaking audiences.