Uganda: Bobi Wine under house arrest after Museveni election win

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Ugandan opposition leader Bobi Wine says he is being held under house arrest after President Yoweri Museveni was re-elected for his sixth term on Thursday.

Bobi Wine, whose real name is Robert Kyagulanyi, says he has been detained under house arrest since he cast his ballot in Thursday’s vote with his property surrounded by security forces. The electoral commission announced Museveni as the winner on Saturday with 59% of the vote against Wine’s 35% although the opposition figure insists the vote was rigged.

Bobi Wine under house arrest

Presidential challenger Bobi Wine said on Tuesday that he and his wife were running short of food and appealed to his supporters in Uganda and around the world to help his family. The opposition leader says his wife was assaulted by soldiers when she attempted to collect food from their garden while his lawyers said they were prevented from seeing the politician on Monday.

US ambassador, Natalie E Brown, was also stopped from visiting Wine at his home late on Monday, prompting authorities in Uganda to accuse the US of subversion.

Wine promises to challenge the result of Thursday’s poll and his party claims to have evidence of election fraud. However, Museveni refutes claims of vote-rigging and Wine’s only political option at this stage is to take his complaints to the Supreme Court, which has a history of siding with long-time president Museveni.

Featured image: By Mbowasport – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=81995826

About Aaron Brooks

Aaron Brooks is a UK journalist who wants to cut out the international agendas in news. Spending his early years in both England and Northern Ireland he saw the difference between reality and media coverage at an early age. After graduating from the University of Chester with a BA in journalism, his travels revealed just how large the gap between news and the real world can be. As Editor-in-Chief at East Africa Monitor, it’s his job to provide a balanced view of what’s going on in the region for English-speaking audiences.